Stages of Firewall Construction

1: Remove Old Ceiling

scamander fire rated linings

 

2: Frame up Firerated wall above Ceiling:

the one i want to use

3: Re-Sheet Fyrcheck Plasterboard Ceiling:

IMG_3371

4: Replace Existing Timber Beads:

IMG_3375

 

5: Trowel Joins and Screw Holes.

IMG_3383

 

6: Paint it and your Done.

IMG_3398

 

Thats one side of the 2 adjoining units and currently we are performing the exact same steps on the otherside in unit 2.

You are required to install firewall according to Australian Safety Standards and get Council to inspect wall and sign off before you finish.

Regards

Phil

http://www.philthecracks.com

Fire Protection Systems

Separating 2 x Units with a Firewall

 

As you can see from the bottom right hand picture, when we first pulled down existing ceiling, there is a gap between the top of blockwork and the top of the roof structure.

The purpose of building a firewall is to fill in this gap to protect each unit individually from each other. So if a fire starts in one, it has protection from the fire spreading to the adjoining unit.

As plasterers we have trained and are qualified to build these life saving walls.

You might see in some of these pictures below, the firewall protrudes out from the main flat firewall. Why you might ask? Well this is because the timber on those beams runs through to the unit adjacent, so therefore if we didnt sheet these timbers out this far and caulk them with the approved fire mastic(see below), then the fire would simply burn the timber through the flat firewall and continue burning on into the next unit on the other side of the blockwork wall.

The distance these timbers are to be sheeted and caulked is 600ml from main wall. This is the Australian Safety Standard we must use when constructing fire rated linings.

You can not see in these pictures but there is also special insulation called Fire Seal, that has also been installed along the top of the fire sheets for extra protection, and in any gaps that need insulating also.

The fire sheets used here are 16ml thick, quite heavy and awkward to cut. But thats a perk of the job, lol.

To prevent fire spread, all screw holes and any gaps have been sealed by approved fire mastic. This stops air getting through and smoke also.

Installing these walls is tedious, takes a lot of time, can be difficult at heights and is heavy work when constructing long and high walls(especially on scaffold). But with all that said it can be very satisfying too, as being the tradesman tasked with building it, you know that potentially the firewall you are building may just save someones property an even more importantly someones life, which makes all the work worth it.

Regards

Phil

http://www.philthecracks.com

 

 

 

Fire Wall Scamander. East Coast Tasmania

Fyrcheck Plasterboard Installation

Working here down at Scamander, East Coast Tasmania, preparing to build a 60/60/60 fire rated wall to go from top of block work to underside of roof structure. Old ceilings already pulled down ready for the fire rated linings.

To comply with Australian Standards and the Break O’ Day council requirements, this wall will be framed using metal studs and plates, approved fire mastic, fire seal insulation and 1 x layer of 16ml fyrcheck plasterboard on both sides of wall, with all timber penetrations to also be covered in fyrcheck plasterboard out to 600ml from the fire wall itself. #fyrcheck #fireratedwall #firewall  #fireprotectionsystems  #philthecracksfirewall #fireratedlinings

Regards

Phil

http://www.philthecracks.com

Installing Plasterboard.

PLASTERBOARD FIXERS

Just wanted to publish these photos so i can explain the importance of installing plasterboard correctly.

This job my team troweled and finished off recently shows joins running both ways in the ceilings and on some walls.

IMG_3303 (1)

The reason for this is the plasterboard fixing was not done correctly. It was actually hung the opposite way.

This created a problem in that we had to trowel full length butt joins, the full ceiling width, when really none should have been there in the first place. There was also some of these full butt joins running vertically down the walls in some areas aswell. These are extremely hard to hide from glancing light, but luckily my team posess the skills and knowledge to do just that.

Now of course this saved the owner money as we only had to trowel this place up, but you must consider when attempting to plaster your own jobs this, it took my team longer than usual to finish this beacuse of all the extra joins we had to trowel and eventually sand. And not to mention the joins themselves needed to be cleated as they were hanging down loosely which means if we did not fix this the joins would eventually crack later down the track.

So with all this extra work we peformed to fix this, did you really save yourself that much money. Just something for you ponder on the next time your thinking of doing your own plastering works.

Anyway, this job has come up well and the owner is over the moon, and not that you could tell now but this used to be a metal framed shed.

Regards

Phil

http://www.philthecracks.com

IMG_3302IMG_3307

Top Plasterer Award. Launceston

Home Improvement 2day awarded my team as one of the Top 25 plastering companies in Launceston. Great work boys.

Phillip Cordwell

Owner/Operator

Phil The Cracks Plastering

Ornate Cornice and Ceiling Roses

Specialist Ornate cornice installed here. The bottom right cornice is 300ml in size and the bottom left cornice is 450ml wide. Very heavy stuff. The ceiling rose at the top is 660ml in diameter. The team did a fantastic job on this 187 year old house near Avoca Tasmania. Very proud of them all.

 

Plastering The Examiner Reception Area

This is the new Examiner newspaper reception area in Launceston. Sheets here are standups as the builder framed the walls to allow this to be done. Great effort by the PTC team to get this finished off fairly quickly.